Keeping Track of Books Read

I have two teens in the house at the moment (13 & 14) and I really appreciate the discussions we have and all the resulting decisions they make in regards to their ‘education’.

We are (currently) lucky in the UK to not have too much monitoring on our learning activities and I’ve traditionally not been great at logging all the things they do.  I always have good intentions, but life gets in the way every single time.

One of my boys has been keen to do some maths, science and chemistry, which he made headway on.  But during that time he also started reading some non-fiction books.  Allocating some time everyday to read.  He’s discovered he really likes learning that way.  And would prefer to continue like that, rather than trying to complete a certain level of maths/science/chemistry – which he’ll still do, but at a slower pace and less pressure (that he puts on himself).

It’s funny, because as adults I think that is how many of us continue our ongoing and natural learning in life.  Finding books of interest, reading them, then looking for more depending on what we are interested in.  At least, that’s how I’ve been doing a lot of my learning for the past 15 years.

I was wondering how to track this, just so I could report back to our local authority.  Initially, I was thinking of just logging it in a document or Trello.  But then that seemed daft when I use GoodReads to log my books (I’m only a recent convert).  It only made sense that he should log his reading using GoodReads too.  And so he is!

The added benefit, for us as parents, is that GoodReads will also encourage him to find books he’d like to read instead of looking to us as guidance.  We don’t mind guiding him, but encouraging him to choose his own is not something he’s done much of.